A One-Person Restaurant with No Servers Is Opening in the Middle of a Field in Sweden

While restaurants around the world are trying to figure out what the new normal will look like for sit-down diners once restrictions ease on coronavirus prevention measures, this couple in Sweden is getting ahead of the game by opening a single-seat...

A One-Person Restaurant with No Servers Is Opening in the Middle of a Field in Sweden

While restaurants around the world are trying to figure out what the new normal will look like for sit-down diners once restrictions ease on coronavirus prevention measures, this couple in Sweden is getting ahead of the game by opening a single-seat restaurant — in the middle of a field.

As Insider first reported, Linda Karlsson and Rasmus Persson plan on opening Bord för En (which translates to table for one) in a lovely meadow near Ransäter, Sweden on May 10. Only one person will be served per day.

The couple thought of the idea after paying a visit to Karlsson’s parents while following social distancing measures to keep safe. Persson, who is a former chef, cooked lunch and served it through the window to where his in-laws were sitting outside —  that’s when the idea clicked. “We should make this available for everyone,” Karlsson told Insider. “It will be the only COVID-19-safe restaurant in the world.” Later that night, they created the website.

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The restaurant consists of one seating arrangement in the middle of an open field. There is no waitstaff, instead each course will be delivered overhead from the kitchen in a basket using a pulley system. The menu will change seasonally and all ingredients will be locally sourced. The current menu on the website features three vegetarian-friendly courses.

The first course is Råraka which is a Swedish-style hash brown served with seaweed caviar and wood plucked sorrel. The next dish, called Black & Yellow, features a yellow carrot-ginger puree, browned hazelnut butter, and sweet corn croquettes. Finally the dessert, playfully called Last Days of Summer features ginned blueberries, iced buttermilk, and homemade viola sugar.

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Each course will also have a cocktail pairing from Joel Söderbäck, a master mixologist with many reputable bars throughout Sweden. Serious sanitation measures will also be held to ensure the safety of their guests — plates and silverware will be cleaned twice between each use and the dining area will be thoroughly disinfected.

How much will a meal at this restaurant cost? Whatever the patron decides. “We are all are facing difficult times and there are people that have lost their jobs, loved ones, or even their mind. We welcome all, no matter what financial situation you are in,” Karlsson told Insider.

Karlsson and Persson plan on operating the restaurant through August 1, according to the publication.