Russell Westbrook Donates Computers to Houston Kids After Switch to Virtual Learning

As schools transition to virtual learning in the wake of the coronavirus, Houston Rockets point guard Russell Westbrook is donating computers to underprivileged students in the Houston area. The NBA player’s Why Not? Foundation worked with...

Russell Westbrook Donates Computers to Houston Kids After Switch to Virtual Learning

As schools transition to virtual learning in the wake of the coronavirus, Houston Rockets point guard Russell Westbrook is donating computers to underprivileged students in the Houston area.

The NBA player’s Why Not? Foundation worked with Comp-U-Dopt and Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner’s office of education to provide 650 computers to students who need them.

Comp-U-Dopt is a nonprofit in the area that has worked to donate computers through a drive-thru program. Turner’s office said 83 percent of the students who receive the computers live in households earning less than $35,000 a year, according to the Associated Press.

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“Russell Westbrook proves why he is a champion on and off the court,” Turner said. “This donation will be a game changer for many students and their families coping with the impact of the COVID-19 crisis.”

Coronavirus, the rapidly-spreading illness formally known as COVID-19, has prompted schools across the country to close and learning has thus shifted online. However, many students without access to computers or the internet are left vulnerable.

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“I’m extremely excited to be able to collaborate with Comp-U-Dopt and find ways to be able to impact the youth immediately,” Westbrook said during a virtual appearance at a press conference Monday. “It’s something that I’m very, very passionate about through my foundation, and I’m just trying to find a way, especially now, to be able to bridge the gap, and give kids access to another way of learning, through computers.”

“This allows them to be able to continue their education, especially from home,” he continued. “I’m happy to be a part of it.”

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